A ‘Little Ice Age’ on the way?

by Robert Maynard

Some of those who have been sounding the chicken little alarm over supposed “global warming”, are now using the phrase “climate change” instead.  There is a good reason for this.  The warming trend of the late 20th Century stopped about 1998 and now some scientists have observed what they refer to as a “Maunder minimum” and they are concerned that it  could lead to a “Little Ice Age.”  A maunder minimum is a low sunspot activity cycle, and has been associated with cooling periods in the past.  While warming periods have actually brought about great prosperity and the advancement of living conditions, cooling periods are another story.  Here is and excerpt from a BBC article on the subject:

It’s known by climatologists as the ‘Little Ice Age’, a period in the 1600s when harsh winters across the UK and Europe were often severe.

The severe cold went hand in hand with an exceptionally inactive sun, and was called the Maunder solar minimum.

Now a leading scientist from Reading University has told me that the current rate of decline in solar activity is such that there’s a real risk of seeing a return of such conditions.

I’ve been to see Professor Mike Lockwood to take a look at the work he has been conducting into the possible link between solar activity and climate patterns.

According to Professor Lockwood the late 20th century was a period when the sun was unusually active and a so called ‘grand maximum’ occurred around 1985.

Since then the sun has been getting quieter.

By looking back at certain isotopes in ice cores, he has been able to determine how active the sun has been over thousands of years.

Following analysis of the data, Professor Lockwood believes solar activity is now falling more rapidly than at any time in the last 10,000 years.

He found 24 different occasions in the last 10,000 years when the sun was in exactly the same state as it is now – and the present decline is faster than any of those 24.

Based on his findings he’s raised the risk of a new Maunder minimum from less than 10% just a few years ago to 25-30%.

And a repeat of the Dalton solar minimum which occurred in the early 1800s, which also had its fair share of cold winters and poor summers, is, according to him, ‘more likely than not’ to happen.

He believes that we are already beginning to see a change in our climate – witness the colder winters and poor summers of recent years – and that over the next few decades there could be a slide to a new Maunder minimum.