Manchester Business Association seeks tax revenue to help attract new visitors

This article by Cherise Madigan originally appeared Oct. 25 in the Manchester Journal.

MANCHESTER, Vt. — The Manchester Business Association says it needs more money to attract more visitors to town because visitors means more money spent in local businesses.

Photo by Cherise Madigan/Manchester Journal

Manchester Business Association President Paul Carroccio proposed the utilization of a portion of Manchester’s Option Tax to fund the organizations marketing efforts. (Photo by Cherise Madigan/Manchester Journal)

So it is requesting a portion of the town’s Option Tax to fund their marketing efforts in a proposal that would “certainly represent a big policy shift for the town” according to Selectboard Chair Ivan Beattie.The proposal was presented by MBA President Paul Carroccio at the Oct. 24 Selectboard meeting, resulting in an extensive discussion between Selectboard members and the many advocates of the association in attendance.

“We’re asking you to be our partner not only from a financial standpoint, but also in trust and a true commitment to what we’re doing, and our commitment to you,” Carroccio said. “We think that bridge needs to happen sooner rather than later.”

Carroccio went on to outline the similarities between the goals of the two entities, particularly when it comes to economic development; cultivating industries like tourism, arts and culture, and food; supporting entrepreneurship and business development; and enhancing the quality of life for residents and workers.

“`Incentives and partnerships can also be appropriate ways to accomplish goals. As in many human endeavors, progress is often best achieved through a balanced approach combining incentive and encouragement with regulations and restrictions,'” Carroccio said, quoting portions of the 2017 Town Plan. “`Implementation can also occur through direct action taken through citizens and leaders in the community.'”

Read full story at the Manchester Journal.

(Fair use with permission from the New England Newspapers Inc.)

3 thoughts on “Manchester Business Association seeks tax revenue to help attract new visitors

  1. I agree with Jrzturtl. If the association wants more people to visit Vermont, make Vermont retailers more competitive.

    How does one do that? Lower the cost of living and doing business in Vermont. After all, not only do businesses pass higher costs on to their customers by way of higher prices, those same businesses will decrease the cost of their goods and services if their costs decrease. That’s what results from a competitive free market. It’s called market equilibrium.

    And beware the budget euphamism describing government spending as ‘revenue neutral’. What that means is, when taxes are cut and resulting tax revenues increase (as they typically do), government spends the increased revenue thereby making the result ‘neutral’.

    The ‘association’ should tell the State government to decrease taxes and spending.

  2. I agree with Jrzturtl. If the association wants more people to visit Vermont, make Vermont retailers more competitive.

    How does one do that? Lower the cost of living and doing business in Vermont. After all, not only do businesses pass higher costs on to their customers by way of higher prices, those same businesses will decrease the cost of their goods and services if their costs decrease. That’s what ressults from a comptitive free market. It’s called market equilibrium.

    And beware the budget euphamism describing government spending as ‘revenue neutral’. What that means is, when taxes are cut and resulting tax revenues increase (as they typically do), government spends the increased revenue thereby making the result ‘neutral’.

    The ‘association’ should tell the State government to decrease taxes and spending.

  3. Apparently, the association is trying to skim a little off the top to prop up a dwindling market for overpriced retail goods. Apparently also, they’ve never heard of the Internet and this small company called Amazon

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