Saudi backed slavery in America: The real “war on women”

by Robert Maynard

The media spends a lot of time covering the accusations from the left that conservatives are waging a “war on women.”  At the same time there seems to be little or no coverage of the real war on women.  According to this article in Human Events from Michelle Malkin, there is a human trafficking ring right here in American supported by Saudi Royals.  Here is an excerpt:

Yes, there’s a war on women in America. But it’s not the phony “war” that tampon-hurling feminists are always shrieking about — as they did last week in Texas to protest tougher regulations on dangerous late-term abortion clinics. No, I’m talking about a real war on women waged by Saudi royals and elites who’ve imported human trafficking and abuse of domestic workers onto U.S. soil.

Meet Meshael Alayban of Saudi Arabia, wife of Abdulrahman bin Nasser bin Abdulaziz al-Saud. She apparently thought we Americans would look the other way at human trafficking and abuse of domestic workers — you know, the way they do in her misogyny-infested home country. The wealthy Meshael Alayban thought wrong.

Last week, Orange County, Calif., prosecutors charged Alayban (who lists her occupation as “princess” on her tourist visa) with felony human trafficking. Enslavement. A Kenyan maid escaped from Alayban’s compound earlier this month after allegedly being held against her will. She told police Alayban confiscated her passport, refused to abide by an employment contract and forbade the worker from returning to her home country — where she has an ailing 7-year-old daughter.

When law enforcement officials entered Alayban’s mansion, they found four other domestic workers from the Philippines who also have indicated a desire to be freed from Saudi bondage. The servants tended to the round-the-clock needs and whims of the princess, her husband, their three young children, a grandmother and three other extended family members. Last week, Alayban posted $5 million bail (paid for by the Saudi consulate) and was whisked back to her estate by a phalanx of bodyguards. She must wear a GPS tracking device and will be arraigned at the end of the month. Her high-priced lawyers dismiss the incident as an insignificant “wage dispute.”