Vermont State Police accepts bump-fire stocks from public

This article by Christie Wisniewski originally appeared Sept. 17 in the Bennington Banner.

BENNINGTON — With two weeks go to until a state ban takes effect, all Vermont State Police barracks have begun accepting bump-fire stocks from members of the public.

Vermont residents who own a bump-fire stock can anonymously turn it in to any of the 10 VSP barracks throughout the state. Barracks staff will take no information about the identity of the person who surrenders the device.

These devices will be held in a “secure area in the barracks pending destruction,” according to a VSP press release. Bump-fire stocks may not be attached to a firearm when they are brought to the barracks, and the stocks must be removed from weapons before entering the barracks.

A prohibition on the ownership of bump-fire stocks was one element of Act 94, a set of gun regulations that was sponsored by Sen. Dick Sears and signed into law by Gov. Phil Scott in April. Under this new law, possession of a bump-fire stock after Oct. 1, 2018 is punishable by up to one year in prison and $1,000 in fines.

The bill also banned high-capacity magazines, raised the minimum age to purchase a gun and expanded background checks to private sales. The constitutionality of the magazine ban has been challenged in two lawsuits.

Read full story at the Bennington Banner.

(Fair use with written permission from the New England Newspapers Inc.)

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons/WASR

5 thoughts on “Vermont State Police accepts bump-fire stocks from public

  1. Bumpstock Well, I had one but I can’t remember where I put it. So maybe one day I’ll find it when the courts say I legal to own. Until then I just don’t know! Maybe the State Police should try stopping the people driving and texting or just gabbing on the phone (steering wheel in one hand, phone in the other) isn’t that against the law? Oh, that’s right go after law-abiding citizens instead they’ll confirm, maybe not this time!

  2. Who needs a ‘bump stock’ when binary triggers are still legal? Also, since when can a State demand the populace turn in anything that was legal (when purchased) with no compensation? I don’t believe the State Police are going to be very busy with this.

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