Welch Watch: VT congressman votes to protect government tax cheats

by Rob Roper

On July 31, Vermont’s lone congressman, Peter Welch, voted to protect tax cheats on the federal payroll. The Federal Accountability Act of 2012, if passed, would prohibit the federal government from hiring tax deadbeats in the first place, in addition to firing those who are already employees.

According to data provided by Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) who authored the bill, nearly 100,000 federal employees owed $1 billion in unpaid income taxes to the federal government in 2009, and that figure has been steadily rising since 2004. The law would take effect nine months after passage, giving those employees time to square their bills with the IRS.

The bill passed the U.S. House on a vote of 263 – 114. Peter Welch (D-VT) voted NO. It now moves on to the Senate.

Not surprisingly, Welch also voted against the Pathway to Job Creation through a Simpler, Fairer Tax Code Act of 2012, which would, if passed, flatten the federal tax code to just two brackets, one of 10% and the other of no more than 25%. It would also set a maximum corporate tax rate of 25%, repeal the Alternative minimum tax and broaden the tax base.

The Pathway to Job Creation through a Simpler, Fairer Tax Code Act of 2012 passed the House 232-189, with Welch voting NO — Of course we can’t cut taxes for hard working Americans. After all, we have to carry the load of all those deadbeat federal employees!

2 thoughts on “Welch Watch: VT congressman votes to protect government tax cheats

  1. On the Fairer Tax Code Act Congressman Welch voted against the working Vermonter with his vote. Remember this in November when you enter the voting both. Vote for someone who cares about the working person because he is one Mark Donka for Congress.

  2. As a Republican candidate got Congress I can not believe that Peter Welch would vote against this. Does this mean Peter is condoning defrauding the Government and being a tax cheat.
    I urge all Vermont voters to write letters to their Newspaper questioning this. Let the public know what their Congressman stands for. I guess violating the law is OK if you work for the Federal Government.

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